Red Carpet Diamonds

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  • Diamond Comparison Tool

    Shopping diamonds just got easier with the Compare Diamonds tool.  View multiple diamonds together on a single page and easily identify their similarities and differences.

    Viewing details of 4 diamonds

    Getting Started

    From diamond detail pages, select “Add to Compare” and the selected diamond’s details are added to the Compare Diamonds tool.  Diamonds added show up in the first or leftmost position on the comparison page.

    Add to Compare; Diamond Details Page

    View Similar

    With one diamond in Compare Diamonds, an option to “View Similar” diamonds allows you to quickly and automatically compare against other diamonds.  This option is displayed only when similar diamonds exist.

    View Similar diamonds option

    Sharing

    Share your compare list with friends and family for feedback and discussion

    Share Comparison List

    Accessing

    View your compare list any time from the shopping cart menu or any diamond details page.

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    From diamond detail

    Best prices of GIA certified diamonds, JewelsBoutique.com.

    Shopping diamonds just got easier with the Compare Diamonds tool.  View multiple diamonds together on a single page and easily identify their similarities and differences.

    Getting Started

    From diamond detail pages, select “Add to Compare” and the selected diamond’s details are added to the Compare Diamonds tool.  Diamonds added show up in the first or leftmost position on the comparison page.

    View Similar

    With one diamond in Compare Diamonds, an option to “View Similar” diamonds allows you to quickly and automatically compare against other diamonds.  This option is displayed only when similar diamonds exist.

    Sharing

    Share your compare list with friends and family for feedback and discussion

    Accessing

    View your compare list any time from the shopping cart menu or any diamond details page.

    Best prices of GIA certified diamonds, JewelsBoutique.com.

  • FIT FOR A PRINCESS

    Here’s a royal dilemma: you love the fire of a traditional round diamond, but you want something a little different—and a little more modern than a classic emerald or radiant cut.

    Princess, have we got a stone for you! The square princess cut diamond marries the sharp geometry of an oblong with all the brilliance of a traditional round.

    There are three basic styles of diamond cuts: brilliant, step, and mixed. Brilliant cuts—including the classic round and our modern princess—have kite-like facets radiating from the center of the stone. A step cut has parallel facets, and a mixed cut combines both. Because the princess is a brilliant cut, it will have more fire and sparkle than either the step-cut emerald or the mixed-cut radiant. Remember that the word “cut” really refers to the arrangement of facets in a diamond, not the shape of its perimeter.  But since each shape also has a basic arrangement of facets, it is ok to just say “cut” and nobody will think Your Highness hasn’t learned her diamond facts.

    The facet arrangements of a princess-cut diamond. Left, face up, and right, face-down. The kite-like facets underneath are what give it its brilliance.

    A princess cut is a little more forgiving than the emerald or radiant cut, so even if your prince’s budget isn’t quite royal, you can drop a grade or two in clarity and still have a beautiful stone.

    The princess cut lends itself well to channel setting, where diamonds are tightly lined in a row between two metal “walls,” i.e. in a channel; and to invisible setting, where they are held in place by metal set underneath and the top appears as an unbroken surface of diamond.

    Take care that your princess-cut solitaire is set to protect its delicate corners from chipping. A bezel around the stone is one option, but if you want a more open look, then choose a classic prong setting. You’ll need at least four prongs, and make sure they gently cup all four corners of the stone.

    But why, you ask? Isn’t a diamond the hardest material on Earth?

    Yes, it is. Diamond is as hard as it gets: a 10 on the Mohs scale of hardness, which means that nothing but another diamond will scratch its surface. But toughness—meaning how well it resists impact—is not the same as hardness. A diamond is pretty tough, but a sharp blow in the wrong place can chip it, especially on the vulnerable corners of a princess cut.

    Always take your fine jewelry off before playing sports, cleaning the house, or (as Queen Elizabeth purportedly can do) fixing the car.

    It’s hip to be square!

    Search Princess Diamonds…

    Here’s a royal dilemma: you love the fire of a traditional round diamond, but you want something a little different—and a little more modern than a classic emerald or radiant cut.

    Princess, have we got a stone for you! The square princess cut diamond marries the sharp geometry of an oblong with all the brilliance of a traditional round.

    There are three basic styles of diamond cuts: brilliant, step, and mixed. Brilliant cuts—including the classic round and our modern princess—have kite-like facets radiating from the center of the stone. A step cut has parallel facets, and a mixed cut combines both. Because the princess is a brilliant cut, it will have more fire and sparkle than either the step-cut emerald or the mixed-cut radiant. Remember that the word “cut” really refers to the arrangement of facets in a diamond, not the shape of its perimeter.  But since each shape also has a basic arrangement of facets, it is ok to just say “cut” and nobody will think Your Highness hasn’t learned her diamond facts.

    The facet arrangements of a princess-cut diamond. Left, face up, and right, face-down. The kite-like facets underneath are what give it its brilliance.

    A princess cut is a little more forgiving than the emerald or radiant cut, so even if your prince’s budget isn’t quite royal, you can drop a grade or two in clarity and still have a beautiful stone.

    The princess cut lends itself well to channel setting, where diamonds are tightly lined in a row between two metal “walls,” i.e. in a channel; and to invisible setting, where they are held in place by metal set underneath and the top appears as an unbroken surface of diamond.

    Take care that your princess-cut solitaire is set to protect its delicate corners from chipping. A bezel around the stone is one option, but if you want a more open look, then choose a classic prong setting. You’ll need at least four prongs, and make sure they gently cup all four corners of the stone.

    But why, you ask? Isn’t a diamond the hardest material on Earth?

    Yes, it is. Diamond is as hard as it gets: a 10 on the Mohs scale of hardness, which means that nothing but another diamond will scratch its surface. But toughness—meaning how well it resists impact—is not the same as hardness. A diamond is pretty tough, but a sharp blow in the wrong place can chip it, especially on the vulnerable corners of a princess cut.

    Always take your fine jewelry off before playing sports, cleaning the house, or (as Queen Elizabeth purportedly can do) fixing the car.

    It’s hip to be square!

    Search Princess Diamonds…

  • SOFT AS A PILLOW

    Little Miss Muffet sat on her tuffet, but you’d rather wear your cushion—diamond, that is.

    Even before Catherine Middleton seamlessly blended old and new tradition when she wed Prince William, brides were blending antique-style jewelry with modern strapless dresses. The cushion-cut diamond, with its romantic vintage appeal, is a perfect center stone for antique-inspired rings with delicate details like scrollwork, engraving, and millegrain settings.

    The cushion cut is a very old style of diamond cutting, dating back hundreds of years. Until the late 1800s, diamond-cutting technology had not advanced enough to produce the brilliant cut (characterized by kite-like facets radiating from the center of the stone), and it wasn’t until 1919 that mathematician and master diamantaire Marcel Tolkowsky devised a set of proportions that came to be the standard for an ideal-cut round brilliant. But until then, the cushion cut, along with the old mine and old European styles of cutting, were the best methods known to maximize a diamond’s natural sparkle. The cushion cut was favored for larger stones.

    The cushion cut, also occasionally called a pillow cut, refers to its shape, which is a rectangle with rounded corners. Unlike the oblong emerald or radiant cut, however, a cushion cut is a short rectangle: its length-to-width proportion should differ by no more than 30%, and often it is much less.

    Cushion cuts also feature larger facets than a brilliant cut, which give it a soft radiance more like an emerald cut than the fiery sparkle of a brilliant. But its larger facets can make inclusions and off-color more visible, and the quality of the cutting is absolutely central to the stone’s beauty. Because it’s not as forgiving as a brilliant cut, a cushion typically will be a higher-value stone than a comparable-size brilliant. But high-quality cushions are greatly prized by collectors, so it’s a sound choice for those who are worried about the long-term value of their diamond as well as its current romantic appeal.

    The facet arrangements of a cushion cut shown face up (left) and face down (right). Note also that the cushion is a short rectangle; length to width ratio is within 30%.

    Once the brilliant cut was devised, cushions grew rare. For a long time, the best—if not only—place to find one was in estate jewelry. But when the vintage look grew popular, diamantaires again began cutting cushions; this time, however, with modern technology that ensures a more consistent quality. Lucky is the bride today who doesn’t have to hunt that elusive but just-right piece of estate jewelry—she can simply recreate the look with a soft, super-feminine cushion cut diamond.

    Search Cushion Diamonds…

    Little Miss Muffet sat on her tuffet, but you’d rather wear your cushion—diamond, that is.

    Even before Catherine Middleton seamlessly blended old and new tradition when she wed Prince William, brides were blending antique-style jewelry with modern strapless dresses. The cushion-cut diamond, with its romantic vintage appeal, is a perfect center stone for antique-inspired rings with delicate details like scrollwork, engraving, and millegrain settings.

    The cushion cut is a very old style of diamond cutting, dating back hundreds of years. Until the late 1800s, diamond-cutting technology had not advanced enough to produce the brilliant cut (characterized by kite-like facets radiating from the center of the stone), and it wasn’t until 1919 that mathematician and master diamantaire Marcel Tolkowsky devised a set of proportions that came to be the standard for an ideal-cut round brilliant. But until then, the cushion cut, along with the old mine and old European styles of cutting, were the best methods known to maximize a diamond’s natural sparkle. The cushion cut was favored for larger stones.

    The cushion cut, also occasionally called a pillow cut, refers to its shape, which is a rectangle with rounded corners. Unlike the oblong emerald or radiant cut, however, a cushion cut is a short rectangle: its length-to-width proportion should differ by no more than 30%, and often it is much less.

    Cushion cuts also feature larger facets than a brilliant cut, which give it a soft radiance more like an emerald cut than the fiery sparkle of a brilliant. But its larger facets can make inclusions and off-color more visible, and the quality of the cutting is absolutely central to the stone’s beauty. Because it’s not as forgiving as a brilliant cut, a cushion typically will be a higher-value stone than a comparable-size brilliant. But high-quality cushions are greatly prized by collectors, so it’s a sound choice for those who are worried about the long-term value of their diamond as well as its current romantic appeal.

    The facet arrangements of a cushion cut shown face up (left) and face down (right). Note also that the cushion is a short rectangle; length to width ratio is within 30%.

    Once the brilliant cut was devised, cushions grew rare. For a long time, the best—if not only—place to find one was in estate jewelry. But when the vintage look grew popular, diamantaires again began cutting cushions; this time, however, with modern technology that ensures a more consistent quality. Lucky is the bride today who doesn’t have to hunt that elusive but just-right piece of estate jewelry—she can simply recreate the look with a soft, super-feminine cushion cut diamond.

    Search Cushion Diamonds…

  • A DIAMOND REPORT CARD

    A straight-A report card is something every parent wants to see. But for a diamond, a D is a very good grade indeed.

    Why does a diamond need a report card? After all, it’s not applying to college or looking to get a job.

    A diamond report card—called a certificate—is an objective evaluation of its quality characteristics. These characteristics are what determine the stone’s market value.

    Many retail jewelers employ graduate gemologists on staff who are qualified to evaluate a stone’s physical qualities, but many also use a gemological laboratory to provide an independent evaluation. While there are a number of gemological laboratories in the world, the one that is recognized universally as a leader is the Gemological Institute of America in Carlsbad, CA. It’s most commonly called by its familiar acronym, GIA.

    A GIA certificate describes a diamond’s physical attributes, including the Four C’s: its color, its clarity, its carat weight, and how well it’s been cut. Color grades go from D (clear as pure water) down to Z, which has very noticeable color. Clarity grades go from “Flawless” (Fl), down to “Included” (I), meaning that inclusions (tiny imperfections) are large enough to be seen by the naked eye. Cut grades range from “excellent” (displaying optimum fire and brilliance) to “poor,” which often means that the stone has been cut to retain as much carat weight as possible, but to the detriment of its natural beauty.  A certificate also can identify whether the stone is natural or laboratory-grown, and whether it’s had any enhancements or treatments.

    Sample grading certificate, © GIA. Reprinted by permission.

    A GIA certificate does not provide a monetary valuation for the stone. The monetary value of a stone is determined by comparing its objective physical qualities to the market and establishing a fair price based on the current state of the market. In that respect, it’s much like real estate, except that location doesn’t matter. A qualified retailer or appraiser would take the certificate, compare it to the market, then determine the value and/or set a price for the stone.

    Because diamonds are graded by human eyes—whether in a lab or by a jeweler—slight variances in grade may occur between two people looking at the same stone. But these variances should be very small—within one grade—and GIA often will have several graders review a stone.  Where there are disagreements, the diamond is referred to the most experienced graders to be the “umpire” and render a final opinion.

    But let’s get back to the diamond report card. Why is it so good for a diamond to get a D, when that same grade got you grounded in high school?

    Simple. Until the middle of the 20th century, there was no single consistent method for evaluating a diamond. One jeweler’s A, B, or C was another’s I, 2, or 3 was another’s 0, 1, or 2—which made it very difficult to determine market value. In the early 1950s, GIA developed its International Diamond Grading System, now the global standard. But to set itself apart from all other grading methodologies in use at the time, GIA chose D as the top grade for its color scale. It also, incidentally, leaves room at the top in case someday some intrepid explorer unearths a diamond whose color is better than the best anyone has yet seen.

    A straight-A report card is something every parent wants to see. But for a diamond, a D is a very good grade indeed.

    Why does a diamond need a report card? After all, it’s not applying to college or looking to get a job.

    A diamond report card—called a certificate—is an objective evaluation of its quality characteristics. These characteristics are what determine the stone’s market value.

    Many retail jewelers employ graduate gemologists on staff who are qualified to evaluate a stone’s physical qualities, but many also use a gemological laboratory to provide an independent evaluation. While there are a number of gemological laboratories in the world, the one that is recognized universally as a leader is the Gemological Institute of America in Carlsbad, CA. It’s most commonly called by its familiar acronym, GIA.

    A GIA certificate describes a diamond’s physical attributes, including the Four C’s: its color, its clarity, its carat weight, and how well it’s been cut. Color grades go from D (clear as pure water) down to Z, which has very noticeable color. Clarity grades go from “Flawless” (Fl), down to “Included” (I), meaning that inclusions (tiny imperfections) are large enough to be seen by the naked eye. Cut grades range from “excellent” (displaying optimum fire and brilliance) to “poor,” which often means that the stone has been cut to retain as much carat weight as possible, but to the detriment of its natural beauty.  A certificate also can identify whether the stone is natural or laboratory-grown, and whether it’s had any enhancements or treatments.

    Sample grading certificate, © GIA. Reprinted by permission.

    A GIA certificate does not provide a monetary valuation for the stone. The monetary value of a stone is determined by comparing its objective physical qualities to the market and establishing a fair price based on the current state of the market. In that respect, it’s much like real estate, except that location doesn’t matter. A qualified retailer or appraiser would take the certificate, compare it to the market, then determine the value and/or set a price for the stone.

    Because diamonds are graded by human eyes—whether in a lab or by a jeweler—slight variances in grade may occur between two people looking at the same stone. But these variances should be very small—within one grade—and GIA often will have several graders review a stone.  Where there are disagreements, the diamond is referred to the most experienced graders to be the “umpire” and render a final opinion.

    But let’s get back to the diamond report card. Why is it so good for a diamond to get a D, when that same grade got you grounded in high school?

    Simple. Until the middle of the 20th century, there was no single consistent method for evaluating a diamond. One jeweler’s A, B, or C was another’s I, 2, or 3 was another’s 0, 1, or 2—which made it very difficult to determine market value. In the early 1950s, GIA developed its International Diamond Grading System, now the global standard. But to set itself apart from all other grading methodologies in use at the time, GIA chose D as the top grade for its color scale. It also, incidentally, leaves room at the top in case someday some intrepid explorer unearths a diamond whose color is better than the best anyone has yet seen.

  • WHEN IS A DIAMOND AN EMERALD?

    Renaissance Engagement Ring Mounting with Emerald Diamond

    Why is an oblong diamond called an “emerald cut?”

    Don’t worry—your diamond isn’t turning green with envy. In this case, “emerald” refers to one of the classic styles of diamond cut.

    While the different styles of diamond commonly are called “cuts,” names like emerald, princess, pear, and marquise, oval, or round actually refer to the shape of a diamond, while the word cut technically refers to the arrangement of facets within the diamond to maximize light return. The way the individual facets are cut—their angles and proportions in relation to each other—is what gives a diamond its magnificent sparkle. That said, however, each of the traditional shapes also has a basic arrangement of facets, so using the word cut really is just fine.

    An emerald-cut diamond got its name because it mimics the way emeralds are traditionally cut. Emeralds belong to the beryl family of minerals, while diamonds are pure carbon. The crystalline structure of a beryl grows in a vertical pattern, which lends itself best to the familiar oblong we often see in emeralds, especially for larger stones.

    Because an emerald-cut diamond has such a large table (the top of the stone) in proportion to the rest of the stone, inclusions are especially noticeable with this cut. Equally noticeable is an off-color stone. For this reason, emerald-cut diamonds tend to be exceptionally high color and clarity, and therefore typically are more expensive than other cuts of the same weight.

    Because of its facet arrangement, an emerald-cut diamond may not have the same degree of fire as other cuts. A brilliant cut, such as the popular round, has kite-like facets radiating from the center. A step-cut like the emerald has elongated parallel facets, and a mixed cut employs both types of facets.

    At left, a face-up drawing of an emerald-cut diamond shows the large table and step-cut facet arrangement. At right, the stone is flipped over for a view of the facets underneath.

    Think of an emerald cut diamond as a crystal clear pool of water reflecting sunlight, whereas a round brilliant is more like a twinkling star or a camera’s flash. For those who want the best of both worlds, diamond cutters have developed a newer version of the emerald cut, called a radiant cut, which is a mixed cut combining the shape of an emerald cut with the addition of some brilliant kite-like facets to reflect more light. While a radiant is a beautiful option, the elegance and quality of a classic, understated emerald cut remains unparalleled.

    Search Emerald Diamonds…

    Why is an oblong diamond called an “emerald cut?”

    Don’t worry—your diamond isn’t turning green with envy. In this case, “emerald” refers to one of the classic styles of diamond cut.

    While the different styles of diamond commonly are called “cuts,” names like emerald, princess, pear, and marquise, oval, or round actually refer to the shape of a diamond, while the word cut technically refers to the arrangement of facets within the diamond to maximize light return. The way the individual facets are cut—their angles and proportions in relation to each other—is what gives a diamond its magnificent sparkle. That said, however, each of the traditional shapes also has a basic arrangement of facets, so using the word cut really is just fine.

    An emerald-cut diamond got its name because it mimics the way emeralds are traditionally cut. Emeralds belong to the beryl family of minerals, while diamonds are pure carbon. The crystalline structure of a beryl grows in a vertical pattern, which lends itself best to the familiar oblong we often see in emeralds, especially for larger stones.

    Because an emerald-cut diamond has such a large table (the top of the stone) in proportion to the rest of the stone, inclusions are especially noticeable with this cut. Equally noticeable is an off-color stone. For this reason, emerald-cut diamonds tend to be exceptionally high color and clarity, and therefore typically are more expensive than other cuts of the same weight.

    Because of its facet arrangement, an emerald-cut diamond may not have the same degree of fire as other cuts. A brilliant cut, such as the popular round, has kite-like facets radiating from the center. A step-cut like the emerald has elongated parallel facets, and a mixed cut employs both types of facets.

    At left, a face-up drawing of an emerald-cut diamond shows the large table and step-cut facet arrangement. At right, the stone is flipped over for a view of the facets underneath.

    Think of an emerald cut diamond as a crystal clear pool of water reflecting sunlight, whereas a round brilliant is more like a twinkling star or a camera’s flash. For those who want the best of both worlds, diamond cutters have developed a newer version of the emerald cut, called a radiant cut, which is a mixed cut combining the shape of an emerald cut with the addition of some brilliant kite-like facets to reflect more light. While a radiant is a beautiful option, the elegance and quality of a classic, understated emerald cut remains unparalleled.

    Search Emerald Diamonds…

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